CRF Blog

What Exactly Did We Learn During the Age of Reason?

by Bill Hayes

In What Exactly Did We Learn During the Age of Reason? for the New York Times Book Review, Michael Wood reviews The Dream of Enlightenment: The Rise of Modern Philosophy by Anthony Gottlieb.

“The Dream of Reason,” the first volume in a history of Western philosophy by Anthony Gottlieb, a former executive editor of The Economist, appeared in 2000, and took us from the ancient Greeks to the Renaissance. The new work starts with Descartes and ends on “the eve of the French Revolution.” Another book is promised, picking up the tale with Kant. Gottlieb’s aim, admirably fulfilled, is to help us see what older and newer philosophers have to say to us but not to turn them into mouthpieces for what we already think we know. “It is tempting to think that they speak our language and live in our world. But to understand them properly, we must step back into their shoes.” This will be true no doubt of the post-Kantian volume as well. Even the shoes next door can look pretty strange if they belong to a philosopher. [more]