CRF Blog

Should an Unpopular Sentence in the Stanford Rape Case Cost a Judge His Job?

by Bill Hayes

The New York Times’ Room for Debate lets various knowledgeable contributors discuss news events and other timely issues. One recent debate covered: Should an Unpopular Sentence in the Stanford Rape Case Cost a Judge His Job?

A California judge sentenced Brock Allen Turner to only six months in jail for raping an unconscious woman after a Stanford University fraternity party, despite her angry, eloquent, courtroom denunciation of the way she and other rape survivors are treated. In response, a petition was started to hold a recall election to throw him off the bench.

But should judges be subject to recall because of an unpopular sentence or would that impede their independence? [more]

See also Independence of the Judiciary, which has these three free lessons: An Issue of Consent (examining the process of advice and consent for appointments to the federal judiciary), Judges and Voters (exploring the role voters should play in state judicial elections), and An Independent Judiciary (tracing the sometimes turbulent history of our independent federal judiciary). All of them are part of CRF’s Bill of Rights in Action Archive.